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Full text of "Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (1890)"

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RE1RORT 



OP THE 



SUPERINTENDENT OF 



PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



State of Florida, 



l 



FOX THE VF.AR 



I F370S 

R611 



L 



Ending September 30ih, 1 



JACKSONVILLE. FLA.. 
DaCoslii Printing and I nblishiug Housr. 






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1 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF 



ALBERT J. RUSSELL, 

Superintendent of Public Instruction, 

FOB THE SCHOOL TEAS 

ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1890. 



•m 







Ll 



I 



I 



i 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Superintendent of Public Instruction. 



•i 



Office 

Superintendent of Public Instruction, 

Pffkf*--- Tallahassee, Fla., Dec. 31st, 1890. 

To His Excellency Francis P. Fleming, Governor of Florida : 

Sir — In compliance with the requirements of law, I have the 
honor to submit herewith the Annual Report of the Superintend- 
ent of Public Instruction for the school year ending September 

Your obedient servant, 

ALBERT J. RUSSELL, 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction. 



REPORT. 

I have great pleasure in reporting the continued and increased 
interest in the public schools in every county in the State, as well 
as a steady advance in thoroughness and efficiency, a stricter re- 
quirement in the qualification of the teachers, and in the atten- 
tion given by county authorities to institutes for teachers, in 
which is evinced a splendid spirit, looking to the advancement 
of the standard of qualification by tne teachers themselves, with 
a view to the excellency of the profession, and its work in the 
school room. In addition to this is the universal increase of 
care and interest on the part of the people and parents, more 
frequent visitation and inquiry into the affairs of the school room, 
encouraging both teacher and pupils, and yet there is room 
and necessity for more of this very wholesome influence. It is 
hoped that very soon every parent and guardian will realize that 
it is a parental duty to look for themselves into the education of 
their children, and show by their anxious care the importance of 
the opportunity to them, and impress still more deeply the re- 
sponsibility of the teacher in his important work. 



N*W SCHOOL HOUSES. 

As will be seen in table No. 5, there have been in many of 
the counties a large increase in the erection of new school houses, 
and these have been, in almost every instance, furnished and 
equipped with the best sittings and furniture, charts and appli- 
ances. The number of new buildings erected during 1889-1890, 
is, as far as reported, 93 ; costing $33,004.62. The number of 
sittings supplied, 5,744; costing $12,673.00. Nearly every 
county in the State has supplied all its schools with the excellent 
common school charts, embracing the entire common school 
course, as well as complete in physiological and hygienic instruc- 
tion and illustration, published by Goodrich & Co, These and 
other modern appliances have added largely to the zeal and inter- 
est of both pupil and teacher, and is promotive of much good in 
the school room. 

RESULTS. 

There can be no doubt now of the results of the public schools 
upon the intelligence of the generation now in the school room, 
and it is my special pleasure to report that no less attention is 
given to the moral training of the pupils than the mental, by 
teachers and county school officers, while absolutely non-secta- 
rian. The influence and precept tends to lead the mind of our 
youth to a knowledge and appreciation of their duty and respon- 
sibility to God, the Nation and the State, as well as their fellow- 
man, and to realize the necessity of a high moral citizenship, as 
well as an intelligent one. 

INCREASE IN SCHOOLS. 

The number of schools has been still increased, notwithstand- 
ing it had appeared at the close of the preceding school year 
that the State, in most parts, had been fully supplied. There 
have been organized and operated forty four new schools during 
the year, which have been supplied with new buildings, furniture 
and appliances, an increase of that number over the number 
operated last year. It is a matter of deep interest and a cause 
of congratulation to witness the passing away of the crude old- 
time school house, and, taking their places, the new are more 
comfortable, better ventilated, lighted and pleasant school 
houses ; the pupils are more thoroughly interested and excited to 
higher and nobler things, and the people of the districts have 
new sources of pride stimulated by these very pleasant innova- 
tions upon the past, and are more tsonceraed and interested. It 
is a fact that school privileges are ample in Florida. The immi- 
grant cannot make a home in the State now but that he will find 
the school house door open to his children, and in convenient 
distance, unless he should xhoose to settle in some unsurveyed 



5 

part of the State, and even these parts are rapidly yielding to the 
increasing population. 

INCREASE IK ENROLLMENT AND ATTENDANCE. 

The increase of enrollments and attendance, as well as in the 
number of school houses, number of teachers, and in the amount 
of money raised and expended for the schools is very interesting 
and encouraging to all who have the intelligence, morality and 
efficiency of the immediately coming men and women of Florida 
at heart. 

In order that your excellency may more easily see and appre- 
ciate their advance and increase, I will insert an extract from my 
report for the school year 1888-1889, ending September 30th, 
1889, parallel with this report for the years 1889-1890. 

Table showing condition of schools in all relations, for the 
years 1888-1889 and 1889-1890 : 

1888-1889. 

Whole number of schools 2,289 

Number of white schools '1691 

Number of negro schools 598 

♦Number of youth school age 113,647 

♦Number of white youth school age 60, 782 

♦Number of negro youth school age 52.865 

Total enrollment youth on registers 86,390 

Total enrollment white youth on registers 53.608 

Total enrollment negro youth on registers ...... 32,78a 

Average daily attendance 63.652 

Number of teachers employed 2,413 

Number of white teachers 1,718 

Number of negro teachers 694 

1 889-1 890. 

Number of schools 2 >333 

Number of white schools i>746 

Number of negro schools 587 

Number of youth school age 113,647 

Number white youth 60,783 

Number negro youth 5*1865 

Total enrollment of youth registered 92,473 

Total enrollment white youth SSi'9 1 

Total enrollment negro youth 37.281 

Average daily attendance 64,819 

Number of teachers employed 2,510 

Number of white teachers 1,849 

Number of negro teachers 66r 

■These three Items are from the school census taken 1S8S, which Is taken every 
four years, and, of course, is the same during the period of four Jean, and, there- 
fore, the same in both years above. 



AMOUNT RAISED FOR SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 

For the year 1888- 1889 there was received by tax in 
all the counties for the maintenance of public 
schools $z63A9°-°°- 

For the year 1889 1890 the amount raised is . . . 399.755- 5 6 

Increase over 1 888- 1 889 $ 3 6 . 26 5-5& 

Amount of apportioned proceeds of sale of lands for 

the year 1888 1889 $37,000.00 

For the year 1889 1890 ; 3 2 . 6 73°° 

A decrease of $4,327.00. This is accounted for in 

the fact that there was an amount discovered as 

due this fund, but in error placed in another 

fund and reitored and apportioned in 1889. 
Amount apportioned of the State one mill-tax for 

public schools in 1888 1889 was $76,000.00 

Amounts of same fund apportioned for 1 889-1 890 . 84,103.31 

An increase in that fund of $ 8,103,31 

TOTAL EXPENDITURE. 

The total expenditure of funds for the support of 

schools for 1 888- 1 889 is $47°.49 - °- 

For the year 1889-1890 it is . . 516,532.70 

Making an increase this year of . '. . . . $40,042.70 
The total cost to the School Fund of the county superin- 
tended cy for the year has been $25,668.33, there being 45 coun- 
ties : the average expense per county has been $570. 40. Amount 
paid teachers' salaries, $336,405- 5 * i there being 2,510 teachers 
employed; the average salary for the school year is $134.32 ; 
average salary of teachers per month is- $5 7. 72-}-. , 

The shortest term of the year has been four months, the 
longest eight months ; average number of days to the year, 120. 
Thus is shown a gratifying increase all along the line of the 
public school wort during the school year 1889- 1890. 

NEGRO SCHOOLS. 

I will take occasion to repeat in this what I said in my last 
report in explanation of the difference in the number of the 

• ' The difference in the number of schools for the white youth 
and the negro, as well as in the number of negro teachers, is ac- 
counted for in the fact that the negroes have to a large extent 
left the rural districts and farms and are congregated m and 
around the cities, towns and villages, and in the fact also that in 
several of the counties there are not enough of them to make 



more than one school, and in two or three counties no school at 
all, and in the cities and towns they are gathered into targe 
schools with several teachers, while the whites are occupying 
the rural districts scattered all over the county and require many 
schools, though small in number of pupils." 

THE SCHOOLS AS TO POPULATIO*. 

Taking the present number of schools, viz.: 2,333, ^d 
placing the population of the State at 400,000, some more than 
the figures given out by the superintendent of the recent census, 
and Florida has a public school opened and conducted not less 
than four months in any instance for every 1 70 of her popula- 
tion, old and young, white and negro, a considerable improve- 
ment in this respect during the year 1889. 1890. The previous 
year made it 174+ of her population to a school. The system 
and organization is readily administered ; the county officers are 
faithful and diligent, good business men and thoroughly in- 
terested in the work, while the cost or expense of the system is 
less or as low as any other State. 

COUNTY HIGH SCHOOLS. 

Several counties have organized and are operating one or 
more of these schools, which are county schools open to any 
pupil from any part of the county who can grade up to the 
lowest grade or class in the high school. The course of study 
in these high schools is designed to fit the youth attending upon 
'them for an ordinary business life, or to prepare them to enter 
the colleges of this or other States. Wherever they have been 
organized and properly conducted they have given a new ira 
petus to school work and interest, and are doing great good for 
the counties in which they have been established. 

GRADED SCHOOLS. 

Graded schools have multiplied all over the State, and a strong 
effort is being made to so grade the entire counties as that, ac- 
cording to the capacity of the pupil, all shall start at the same 
point in every school, even the most remote or isolated, and 
pursue the same course, so that in case of removal from one 
school neighborhood into another the pupil entering the school 
at his new home will enter at the point he closed with at his 
former school, and go on without interruption or loss. 

The entire common school course, embracing the primary 
branches, with the arithmetic complete, United States history 
complete, geography, physical and political ; English grammar 
and elementary physiology and hygienic laws, with special re. 
fere nee to the effects of alcoholic stimulants and narcotics upon 



8 

the human system ; light and ventilation ; is divided into eight 
grades, each grade supposed to accomplish its work thoroughly 
in the school year. 

It is the design of the State Board of Education to stress the 
point of some manual training in all the schools, so that some 
knowledge of tool craft and practical life may he had by all the 
youth of the State. 

STATE INSTITUTIONS, 

The State Institutions of Education are the Florida Agricul 
tural and Mechanical College, located at Lake City, Columbia 
County; the West Florida Seminary, located at Tallahassee; 
the East Florida Seminary, located at Gainesville ; the Institute 
for the Blind and Deaf-mute, located at St. Augustine; the Nor- 
mal College for the training of white teachers, located at De- 
Funiak Springs, and the Normal College for the training of negro 
teachers, located at Tallahassee ; tuition in each and all of these 
is entirely without cost to pupils, except the two seminaries de- 
scribed below. 

FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

This institution is designed not only to give a liberal literary 
education, but to impart also a knowledge of the theory and 
practice of economical and successful farming and an industrial 
training, consisting of tool craft, mechanical drawing, together 
with special courses in civil engineering, a business course, 
telegraphy and type writing, at the option of the student or his 
parents. An excellent faculty has been placed in charge, large 
and commodious college buildings and dormitories are supplied 
and equipped in each of their special departments and supplied 
with scientific apparatus and appliances, and is now ready for 
the literary, agricultural and mechanical education of the young 
men of the State. The expense of living at the College has been 
reduced to the minimum, being at a cost of $9.00 per month, and 
wholesome, substantial food supplied. The students are offered 
an opportunity to reduce this by working on the farm and college 
grounds at an allowance per hour. 

This school is, by the law creating it, one in which military 
tactics and science must be taught and is under military disci- 
pline aod system. This, though an excellent feature of a sound 
education, is by no means paramount, but subordinate, and sup- 
plements the main features of the college work. It is a feature, 
however, admirable in that it begets a manliness of deportment 
and carriage, courage and thorough system. 

For further information I refer to the following letter from 
the President, F. L. Kern : 



State Agricultural College, ) 
Lake City, Fla., January 15, 1S91. j 

Hon. A. J. Jtussell, State Superintendent Public Instruction and 
President Board of Trustees Florida Agricultural College, Tal- 
lahassee, Fla. : 

Dear Sir — Reporting on the Florida Agricultural College, 
it gives me pleasure to say that this institution is making sure 
and steady progress in every respect, having at present a much 
better class of students than were ever enrolled before, and all 
departments are prospering in a thrifty condition. 

The attendance is not quite as large as we would like, but 
fully as many as could be expected under the circumstances. 
Raising the standard resulted in eliminating the lower grade of 
cadets and also those of immoral character. A wholesome, 
moral atmosphere now pervades the college, and all are striving 
to attain to a high standard of excellence. 

The boarding facilities are greatly improved, so that students 
now receive excellent board at $0 per month, and as no tuition 
is charged residents of Florida, the annual expenses need not 
exceed $120 per annum, including cost of uniform. 

The discipline is a mild but wholesome military system which 
holds each cadet strictly to duty and corrects bad habits. The 
entire faculty and corps of cadets are in perfect harmony, and a 
warm feeling of sympathy and good-will prevails. 

The military department is not allowed to conflict with the 
other lines of work, but is found to be a valuable supplement to 
all other training, and in no department do the cadets show more 
improvement than the drill iu which all take a lively interest. 
Major H. P. Bay a, Professor of mathematics, as Acting Com- 
mandant, is eminently successful. 

Students are given their choice between a course in classics, 
English and science, or an English college course with agri- 
culture and mechanics. About half are found in each course. 
In agriculture the course in lectures, text-books and field work is 
about the same as is offered in other similar colleges. There is 
an especially lively interest taken in manual training and 
mechanical drawing. The new Professor of mechanical engi- 
neering, Mr. H. C. Powers, is a competent and ambitious man, 
who is doing an excellent work,*and there is pressing need for 
additional facilities in his department before ihe whole course 
can be taught, which, we trust, the coming general assembly of 
legislators will gladly supply. 

The classical department, together with agriculture under 
Professor Whitner ; the department of language and literature, 
under Professor Seals; mathematics and military, under the 
charge of Major Bay a, and physical science, taught by Professor 
Pickell, are all doing good, thorough work, giving results which 



IO 

are highly satisfactory, as are shown by the monthly examinations 
and reported to parents of cadets. 

Our present enrollment is 103, with probably several more to 
enter. A few have withdrawn because of failure to maintain 
their standing, others on account of sickness or hard times. 

By recent Act of Congress, we shall soon receive a liberal 
endowment from trie general government, when many needed 
facilities will be provided, together with additional teaching 
force. This special endowment begins with $15,000 for the 
first year, and increases by an additional $t,ooo per annum, 
until it reaches $25,000 per annum, when it continues at that 
sum. This endowment must be equitably divided with a school 
for colored students, organized on a similar plan with ours. 

The limit of this report precludes giving further particulars- 
Persons interested should send for complete catalogue and copy 
of our college paper. Respectfully. 

F. L. Kern, 

President. 

SEMINARY FOR THE WESTERN DIVISION. 

The seminary for all that portion of Florida west of the Su- 
wannee River, is located at Tallahassee and is an excellent 
school, doing most thorough work in a course of study as high 
and complete as most of the colleges of the country. It has an 
admirable corps of instructors and an outfit in appliances of 
scientific character, enabling them to impart the practical side 
of the school work. They recognize the necessity of a general, 
practical knowledge of business relations and industrial capacity, 
and are planning their general work to these ends. 

Each county in the Western Division of the State is entitled 
to as many scholarships, without charge for tuition, as it has rep- 
resentatives in the Legislature, and tuition for others who may 
desire to avail themselves of the advantages of so excellent a 
school is placed at a very reasonable figure. Every county 
should be represented largely in this seminary ; there are very 
few better opportunities, either educational, social or moral, any- 
where. 

A very fine, new college edifice is now near completion, and 
will be fully ready and equipped for the work 1891-1892, situ- 
ated magnificently upon College Hill, over-looking the beautiful 
panorama of landscape peculiar to this section of the State. The 
buildings and location become no mean adjunct in the educa- 
tional work of the West Florida Seminary. For further and 
more complete information I refer you to the letter of President 
G. M. Edgar, following : 



II 

Tallahassee, Fla., December 30, 1890. 
Hon. A. J. Russell, Stale Superintendent of Public Instruction : 

Dear Sir— In response to your request, I hereby submit 2 
brief statement of the "condition, class of work, number of 
students, status of edifice" of this institution, to be engrafted in 
your annual report to the Governor of the State. 

Since my last report was submitted, much hard work has 
been done by the faculty of the seminary, which, I am glad to 
be able to say, has been fruitful of good results. As a rule, the 
students have been studious and exemplary in conduct, and not 
a few of them have gained merited distinction for the high 
averages they have attained after being subjected to the rigid ex- 
aminations required by our system. It augurs well for the 
future of both the students and the institution that so many of 
our matriculates have persevered in the effort to secure thorough 
academic and collegiate training before entering upon their 
life-work, and that, as a result, we have now four collegiate and 
' two high school classes — the complement of classes provided for 
in our curriculum. 

It is believed that the class of work that is required of these 
students will compare most favorably with that required of 
similar grades in the better class of colleges in the South, and 
that the institution is worthy to be considered an important factor 
in training Florida youth for citizenship. 

For detailed information as to the courses of instruction, you 
are referred to the last annual catalogue. 

Up to the present date there have been seventy (70) students 
enrolled. Judging from past experience, we may reasonably 
expect an appreciable increase during the remaining months of 
the session; but the number of students cannot be large until 
provision has been made for college boarding houses for both 
sexes, enabling the Board of Education to offer board at lower 
rates than we are able to obtain board for them in private families. 
It was a disappointment to the beard and to the faculty that the 
last Legislature did not appropriate the full amount ($25,000) 
which its Visiting Committee reported to be needed to erect a 
suitable educational building and boarding houses, and supply 
them with the necessary furniture and apparatus. The board 
wisely determined to use the $15,000 appropriated in the erec- 
tion of one good building to be used chiefly for educational pur- 
poses, leaving the responsibility of providing the boarding houses 
to the next Legislature. The building, which is now approach- 
ing completion, is handsome and commodious and will afford 
ample study halls, laboratories and class rooms for a large num- 
ber of students. It is built of brick, trimmed with Georgia 
marble, and it is believed that, when finished, it wilt be pro- 
nounced to be one of the prettiest and most substantially built 
public buildings in the State. 



13 

It is to be hoped that the next Legislature will make the 
necessary appropriations to provide ample boarding houses for 
both sexes, to enclose and beautify the grounds, supply the 
buildings with all needed appliances and add a reasonable sum 
to the annuity of the institution to enable the Board of Education 
to increase the faculty and establish an industrial department for 
the training of both sexes in such practical arts as will fit them 
for the highest usefulness. 

I trust, Sir, that I shall have your co-operation in the effort 
to secure what is needed to increase the efficiency and enlarge 
the usefulness of the institution. 

Respectfully submitted, Geo. M. Edgar. 

SEMINARY FOR THE EASTERN DIVISION. 

The seminary for the Eastern Division of the State, all that 
portion east of the Suwannee River, is located at Gainesville, 
Florida, one among the most thriving and beautiful towns of the 
State ; incorporated under the same laws as is the West Florida 
Seminary, its purpose and object is similar. In both these valu- 
able and important institutions the very admirable plan of the 
co-education of the sexes prevails, and the daughters as well as 
the sons of the State are provided with these excellent opportu- 
nities of higher education. 

It is needless for me to write of the excellence of this semi- 
nary. Its reputation has gone abroad, not only in our own 
State, but beyond its limits, and students from other States are 
in yearly attendance. It is not only imparting a liberal literary 
and business education, but it is prominently a military school, 
affording all the benefits that the system, order, manliness and 
regularity that discipline produces in the young man brought 
wholesomely under its influence. Scholarships are under the 
same regulations and privileges in both seminaries. 

The college and barracks buildings of the East Seminary, are 
of recent construction and are admirable in their adaptation in 
their respective relations. The study rooms and lecture halls 
are well equipped and the corps of teachers excellent. It is an 
opportunity that every parent should avail him or herself of in 
the interest of their children. I refer to the following letter of 
its President, Col. E. P. Cater, for more detailed information : 

East Florida Semiary, 1 

Gainesville, Fla., December 25, 1890. j 

Hon. A. J. Russell, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, 

Tallahassee, Fla: 

Dear Sir — In compliance with your request, I beg leave to 
report as follows : 

Session 1 889-1 890 was the most prosperous in the history of 



13 

this seminary. (See report of Board of Visitors, a copy of which 
is herewith sent you.) 

The present session, iSoo-'at, began September 35, 1890. 

I Number of Students.— Enrollment to date, cadets eighty ; 
young ladies, tweaty-seven ; total, one hundred and seven. 
Number of Florida counties represented, nineteen ; number of 
other States represented, eight. The representatives from these 
other States are not the children of winter visitors, but they are 
here Tor the sole purpose of attending the East Florida Seminary. 
The number of scholarship students is thirty- six ; of pay students, 
seventy one. Average age of cadets, about seventeen years; of 
young ladies, about sixteen. Several additional students are to 
report after the Christmas vacation, and the enrollment for the 
session will probably exceed that of last session. 

II. Instructors. — The Academic Board for the present ses- 
sion, is as follows : 

Edwin P. Cater, A. M., Superintendent. 

Ghas. S. Riplry, Lieut. U. S. Navy. Commandant. 

J. W. Patton (V. M. I.), Asst. Commandant. 

W. R. Thomas { E. F. S. and Kentucky State Normal). 

H. H. Alexander (V. M. I. >. 

T. F. Thomas, M. D., Surgeon. 

III. Course of Study. — a. Mathematics, including arithmetic, 
business arithmetic, book-kt eping, algebra, plane geometry, plane 
trigiuiomftry and plane surveying 

b. Natural science, including political and descriptive geogra- 
phy, physiology, physical geography, elementary physics and 
ele.nent iry chemistry. 

c. English language and history, including English grammar, 
rhe one. history ot United States and general history. 

d. Ancient languages, including a three years' course itt 
Laun and a two years' course in Greek. 

e. Mi> Jem language including a one years' course in French 
and i|>. siitne in Spanish. 

f. S ulling, reading, elocution, writing and drawing receives 

'nil systematic attention. 

IV Apparatus. — The supply of illustrative appliances is 
am|.i 1 ne work in geography, physical geography, physiology, 
phyiA hi l chemistry. 

V \1ith 'D (if Teaching. — Daily recitations with oral in- 
str ( ,111 itthly examinations, annual examinations, and the 
fiiiai iiiplnma examination. Much written and black-board 
wurk 1 mi ntred of the students. 



INTENTIONAL SECOND EXPOSURE 



13 



It is to be hoped that the next Legislature will make the 
neccMaiy appropriations to provide ample boarding houses for 
both sexes, to enclose aod beautify the grounds, supply the 
buildings with ail needed appliances and add a reasonable sum 
to the annuity of the institution to enable the Board of Education 
to increase the faculty and establish an industrial department for 
the training of both sexes in such practical arts as will fit them 
for the highest usefulness. 

I trust, Sir, that I shall have your co-operation in the effort 
to secure what is needed to increase the efficiency and enlarge 
the usefulness of the institution. 

Respectfully submitted, Geo. M. Edgar. 

SEMINARY FOR THE EASTERN DIVISION. 

The seminary for the Eastern Division of the State, all that 
portion east of the Suwannee River, is located at Gainesville, 
Florida, one among the most thriving and beautiful towns of the 
State ; incorporated under the same laws as is the West Florida 
Seminary, its purpose and object is similar. In both these valu- 
able and important institutions the very admirable plan of the 
co-education of the sexes prevails, and the daughters at well as 
the sons of the State are provided with these excellent opportu- 
nities of higher education. 

It is needless for me to write of the excellence of this semi- 
nary. Its reputation has gone abroad, not only in our own 
State, bnt beyond its limits, and students from other States are 
in yearly attendance. It is not only imparting a liberal literary 
and business education, but it is prominently a military school, 
affording all the benefits that the system, order, manliness and 
regularity that discipline produces in the young man brought 
wholesomely under its influence. Scholarships are under the 
same regulations and privileges in both seminaries. » 

The college and barracks buildings of the East Seminary, are 
of. recent construction and are admirable in their adaptation in 
their respective relations. Tne study rooms and lecture halls 
are well equipped and the corps of teachers excellent. It is an 
opportunity that every parent should avail him or herself of in 
the interest of their children. I refer to the following letter of 
its President, Col. E. P. Cater, for more detailed information ; 

East Florida Skmiary, 1 

Gainesville, Fla., December 25, 1890. J 

He*. A. /. RuutB, State Superintendent of Publk Instruction, 

ToUahasset, Flat 

Dear Sir — In compliance with your request, I beg leave to 
report as follows : 

Session 1 889-1 890 was the most prosperous in the history of 



*3 

this seminary. (See report of Board of Visitors, a copy of which 
is herewith sent you.) 

The present session, i8oo-'qi, began September 25, 1890. 

I N umber of Students. — Enrollment to date, cadets eighty ; 
young ladies, tweity-seven ; total, one hundred and seven. 
Number of Florida counties represented, nineteen ; number of 
other States represented, eight. The representatives from these 
other States are not the children of winter visitors, but they are 
here for the sole purpose of attending the East Florida Seminary. 
The number of scholarship students is thirty-six ; of pay students, 
seventy-one. Average age of cadets, about seventeen years ; of 
young ladies, about sixteen. Several additional students are to 
report after the Christmas vacation, and the enrollment for the 
session will probably exceed that of last session. 

II. Instructors. — The Academic Board for the present ses- 
sion, is as follows : 

Edwin P. Cater, A. M., Superintendent. 

t has, S. Ripley, Lieut. U. S. Navy, Commandant. 

J. W. Patton (V. M. I.), Asst Commandant. 

W. R. Thomas ( E. F. S. and Kentucky State Normal). 

H. H. Alexander (V. M, I. ). 

T. F. Thomas, M. D., Surgeon. 

III. Course or Study. — a. Mathematics, including arithmetic, 
business arithmetic, book-keeping, algebra, plane geometry, plane 
trignnunwiry and plane surveying 

A. N atural science, including political and descriptive geogra- 
phy, physiology, physical geography, elementary physics and 
elemmwry chemistry. 

c. English language and history, including English grammar, 
rhe unc. history 01 United States and general history. 

d. Ancient languages, including a three years' course in 
Lai in and a two y tars' course in Greek. 

e. Modern language including a one years' course in French 
and the same, in Spanish. 

f. S it-lling, reading, elocution, writing and drawing receives 
rtgit in ■ iik) systematic attention. 

IV Apparatus. — The supply of illustrative appliances is 
am|<l> 1 Lite work in geography, physical geography, physiology, 

physl nl chemistry. 

V Ot.TH <d «if Teaching. — Daily recitations with oral in- 
sir 1 . hi nihly examinations, annual examinations, and the 
final ■nploma examination. Much written and black- board 
work 1 ■ 1 1| nired of the student?. 1 



N 



14 



VI. Literary Societies.— There are two literary societies 
which hold weekly meetings on Saturday mornings. 

VII. Discipline and Military Exercises.— The seminary 
is under military discipline, and one hour daily, the hour just be- 
fore sundown, is devoted to military drill. There are no mili- 
tary duties at any other times. 

VIII. Expenses.— Entire annual expense, including board, 
lights, fuel, washing, room rent, furniture, entrance and tuition 
fees, books and stationery, and uniforms, $185. For county ap- 
pointees the cost is $20 less. 

IX. Income. — The income from the interest fund is less than 
$3,000 ; the cost of conducting the school is $5,000. Hence the 
necessity for supplementing the income by charging tuition fees 
for all save county appointees. 

X Buildings and Grounds. — The academic building and 
the dormitory for the residence of students and teachers are 
handsome, commodious, and admirably adapted to the purposes 
and regime of a military school. 

The grounds are ample, and the drill ground is probably the 
finest in the State. The arrangements for lighting and heating 
the buildings have been pronounced by competent judges to be 
of the very best, and the system of sanitation has been endorsed 
as excellent by the highest health authority in the State. 

The study hall and class rooms in the academic building, are 
supplied with the very best modern school furniture. I talte 
pleasure in quoting from the Board of Visitors in their report to 
you for the year 1889-1890 : 

REPORT OF BOARD of visitors. 

"It affords us great pleasure to report that the past scholastic 
year of the East Florida Seminary has witnessed an increased at- 
tendance of students drawn from a more extended area, that an 
enlarged interest of parents and friends has been evinced, and a 
general measure of prosperity shown by its financial and aca- 
demic reports. . .,.:. 

"The number of students enrolled has been 137, which is a 
large increase over the previous year, and we believe the largest 
number the seminary has hitherto reached. 

"The students represent twenty-one counties and eight States. 

"Of this number fifty have been scholarship students and 
eighty seven pay students. The fact that so large an attendance 
of pay students has been secured evinces the estimation in which 
it is held and the growing reputation it is attaining. As a conse- 
quence of the increase of pay students, the financial condition of 
the institution has been bettered, enabling it to increase its 
facilities. 



15 

"We are glad to observe that our people are learning to value 
this State institution, which has earned high commendation in 
the past, and offers the advantages of a liberal education at their 
doors, at a cost far below that required in sending their children 
abroad for education. 

' The interest shown by the citizens of Gainesville is hearty 
and appreciative, and the fact that more than half the pay stu- 
dents came from Alachua County indicates their sense of the 
value of the school and their pride in its success. 

"An examination of the reports of scholarship for the past 
yeai, shows that the institution has maintained its former excel- 
lent standard, and the faithfulness and zeal of its corps of Pro- 
fessors has been evinced in the satisfactory results attained by the 
several classes. All that is now needed to insure the future of 
the East Florida Seminary is a fair recognition of its claim by the 
Legislature and a generous, active support of our own people. 
"Very respectfully, G. R. Fairbanks, 

"Chairman Board of Visitors." 
Very respectfully yours, 

Edwin P. Cater, 
Superintendent East Florida Seminary. 

STATE NORMAL COLLEGE FOR WHITE STUDENTS. 

This college, instituted in 1887 by an act of the Legislature 
and maintained by annual appropriation, has proven a success- 
ful enterprise from the beginning. It has graduated two classes 
composed of both sexes, who have been eagerly sought for as 
teachers of public schools, and have proved quite successful in their 
work. The State has erected a comfortable and well adapted edifice 
delightfully located, and has, through the devotion and gener- 
osity of ex Senator A. R. Jones, procured a very commodious 
and well adapted dormitory in which students can obtain board 
at a very low rate and under the best regulations and moral in- 
fluence. The building being contiguous to both the college 
building and the residence of the President, brings the whole 
under his personal supervision and care. 

. The college is furnished with a library of reference books 
an«J scientific apparatus and other requirements necessary. The 
course of study embraces two years, in which the Academic 
Course is reviewed and the higher branches taught. A prepar- 
atory course has been found essential in which is supplied the 
deficiencies of the preparation of the students in the public 
schools, ' 

This school is doing an excellent work for the State, 
especially as it relates to her public school system in preparing 
our own young men and women to enter our schools and engage 
in the work. They are acquainted with our conditions, rural 



i6 

and otherwise, and are prepared to adapt themselves to them 
and work heartily and sympathetically for improvement, while the 
stranger coming from other States which are older and better pre- 
pared for the work, in some respects, are sure to feel that it is 
a hardship to endure our country work and always seek em- 
ployment in the cities, towns and villages of the State. What 
the State needs now, most, is an army of teachers — young men 
and women to the manor born, acquainted with our necessities, 
crudities, if you please, in some local features, and well and 
thoroughly qualified for the work. This school is nobly doing 
this very thing for the State. I have the pleasure of referring to 
the following letter from Prof. H. N. Felkel, President : 

DeFuniak Springs, Fla., Dec. 20, 1890. 

Hon. A. J. Russell, State Superintendent Public Instruction, 

Tallahassee, Fla.: 

Sir — In reply to yours asking for a report of the State Normal 
College for white students, I have the honor to submit the following: 

The condition of the school as to attendance and the char- 
acter of the work being done is better than ever before in the 
history of the institution. Our enrollment to date for the pres- 
ent scholastic year numbers eighty-four, which is twenty per 
cent, in excess of what it was for the corresponding period last 
year. The accessions looked for at the beginning of our Febru- 
* ary term will ina-ease the attendance to over one hundred. Our 
students are earnest and industrious and the work done by them 
is in every way most satisfactory. 

The buildings belonging to the school, consisting of the col- 
lege building proper, the dormitory and the President's residence 
are all in good condition, but the first named is without a fence, 
while the enclosures around the others are in much need of 
repairs. We would, therefore, respectfully direct attention to 
this matter and suggest, if the amount of funds will permit, 
that the Board of Education make an appropriation to provide 
the necessary fencing. 

The apparatus belonging to the school is quite sufficient for 
illustrating ordinary phenomena connected with the sciences of 
chemistry, physics, physiology, physical geography and astron- 
omy. 

I think it safe to estimate the value of the property belonging 
to the school, including buildings, furniture and apparatus, at 
ten thousand dollars. Respectfully yours, 

H. N. Felkel, President. 

STATE NORMAL COLLEGE FOR COLORED STUDENTS. 

This institution is located at Tallahassee, and was instituted 
at the same time as was the college for white students, and is 



17 

maintained in the same way, out of the fund appropriated for 
the first year, by much economy and restraint a very com- 
fortable and well adapted building for three departments of 
work was erected, and the school thoroughly organized and 
started upon its career. There have been as yet no graduates, 
because of the positive need of a thorough preparation in the 
common school course, while the position of the Faculty and 
the State Board of Education is that no student can pass out 
with the signatures of either unless upon merit. 

Since the interests and peculiar features of this school, par- 
ticularly from a social point of view, are of special interest, I have 
requested its President to write at length upon its condition, its 
progress, the work done, the reflex influence upon the public 
schools for negro children, and especially in reference to indus- 
trial and manual training, and will therefore surrender space to 
his letter in reply, which follows: 

Tallahassee, Fla., Dec. 26, 1890. 
Hon. A. J. Russell, State Superintendent Public Instruction, 

Tallahassee, Fla.: 

Sir — I beg leave to submit the following statement of facts 
relative to the Normal College for colored students, located in 
this city : 

One of the chief ends of a successful and practical state- 
craft is to lay under tribute each and every agency which can 
aid to develop the well-being of the commonwealth. If the 
resultant happiness of a people is to be determined by the 
amount of good produced by all the resources at their command, 
it would follow that a failure to subject any one of these means 
to its fullest measure of development is to inflict heavy and un- 
necessary burdens on those who contribute to the general wel- 
fare. Drones, therefore, either from choice, or from their 
undeveloped powers, in the social economy of man, like the 
drones in the busy bee hive, fatten upon the labors of their fel- 
lows, and to that extent take away from the general prosperity. 
To work as well as he can, with mind and hand, should be the 
aim of every person in the community, and that each may be 
enabled to be thoroughly efficient to give his share to the com- 
mon weal, should be among the first purposes of government. 
It is, indeed, gratifying that, however bitter passions may have 
been engendered consequent on the wondrous social change 
wrought a quarter of a century ago in this portion of our repub 
lican empire, the dominant race now recognizes the wisdom of 
accepting accomplished facts in its willingness to give the 
negro the training he needs to make him an intelligent and use- 
ful factor in the huilding of our State. It would, indeed, go 
without saying, to observe that if he were to be left in his ignor- 
a 



tS 

ance, if his latent energies were to remain free from friction with 
useful and intelligent activity, he must remain an intolerable 
burden on the forces which are moving with well directed ener- 
gies to give our State a prestige in the sisterhood of the American 
Union. The dominant class"owe it to themselves, as a matter 
of duty and interest, as it is an act of the highest patriotism, to 
give the negro a free and fair opportunity to disclose all his pro 
ductive powers, so that, becoming a partner in toil, he might 
rejoice with them in the fatness of the land. So well grounded, 
we feel, has become the conviction that the full training of this 
race is needed by the highest good of the State, we never expect 
to see a change of this policy, whatever may be the chances and 
changes of political Darties in this State and nation. The interest 
manifested in the Normal college by every class and condition of 
citizens in this immediate part of the State, bespeaks in a small 
way the general determination to make the school an abiding 
and efficient means for the complete mental equipment of the 
negro. Buoyed up with a knowledge of this healthy sentiment, 
the Faculty of the institution are working with a will and vim 
justified by the sacredness of the charge entrusted to ihem, and 
the great results expected from their labors. 

GENERAL POLICY OF INSTRUCTION. 

Whatever may be the general and commonly accepted course 
of instruction, must be more or less, in detail, adapted to the 
special class sought to be benefited, or it will prove a failure. 
If education in its broadest term consists in a rounding off of all 
the faculties, then that course of instruction alone is most com- 
plete which will wholly draw out and enlarge the capacities of 
the student. The race for whom the Normal college was found- 
ed, will be, for a long time to come, largely dependent for all 
the helpful elements of success in life on the training given 
them in school. While the acquisition of letters is the main 
end, it is a leading aim to teach morals, both by precept and 
example. "Here a little, and there a little," in the injeciion of 
sound moral truths relating to home and general public life, is 
given at all times during school hours, when occasion arises. 
In addition to this, as far as press of time will permit, monthly 
lectures on moral or social topics are delivered. A sense of 
that which is ennobling, a love for the good/^r «, form a part 
of the daily unwritten curriculum. In the matter of social 
economy, we teach the doctrine that labor of the hand is the 
first need of the man who would be a useful and respected mem- 
ber of the people among whom he lives; that the poor person 
who regards work as a disgrace must live the life either of a 
shabby genteel beggar, or prey upon society and land in a felon's 
cell; that thrift and economy are synonymous with usefulness 
and respectability. 



'9 

The course of study has been prepared with special view 
to impart the most instruction in the limited extent of time 
at our command. We aim not %t show or reputation, but thor- 
oughness and practicability. The students are specially drilled 
in the abstract sciences in which they are the weakest, while 
their strong linguistic powers are given the fullest exercise. The 
imperfect attainments in the common studies which they bring 
to the institution are displaced by a severe training in the same 
studies, when they are canied through algebra to quadratics, 
and through several books of geometry. In all these studies 
they can compete favorably with scholars of similar grade any- 
where. In the Latin, the only classic thus far taught, they are 
carried through several books of Cssar's Commentaries, just 
enough to give them a proper foundation to continue the study 
of the thoughts of the iron-hearted masters of the ancient world . 
after graduation. Although it is less than two years since the 
senior class began the study of Latin, several of them can now 
read Oesar with an ease and elegance that would do credit to 
scholars who have been engaged twice the length of time in 
studying this language. 

INTEREST IN ATTENDANCE ON THE SCHOOL. 

The surest test for the appreciation of the race for the school 
is in the sacrifices made by patrons in sending and maintaining 
scholars here, and the eagerness of the latter to avail themselves of 
the opportunity offered them for instruction. With limited means, 
or from daily earnings, parents send their children to this school 
from distant parts of the State, and meet all the financial en- 
gagements incident to the education of a young person, during 
the entire session of nine months. Although this is the secoid 
year since the school has had dormitory halls, not only has every 
patron met all his obligations, but the demand for more room in 
the dormitories is restricted by our inability to provide for any 
more new-comers. 

The promptness and regularity of attendance at the daily 
sessions of the school, is another proof of high appreciation. 
No severer punishment for breach of discipline can be inflicted 
on any of them than to be ordered to leave school for even 
part of a day. They seem to feel that every day and hour are 
too precious to be lost from the prosecution of the purpose for 
which they have come hither Iroro their homes. This strong 
regard and attachment for a school but lately established, is one 
of the most pleasing features which promise for it, let it be 
hoped, a long career of usefulness. The number of students 
enrolled since the opening of the first session, Oct. 3, 1887, to 
date, is 134, embracing a representation of eighteen counties. 
The attendance for the last and current year is 74, with a larger 



20 

number fron counties outside of Leon than at any time since 
the beginning of the school. 

The senior class of six members will graduate and leave us 
next year to go forth as the vanguard of many similar bodies to 
engage in the important work of training the youth of the State. 
Wherever the services of our undergraduates have been once 
had, there they are held most in demand — a testimouial to their 
efficiency and the need of them as workers in the common 
schools. 

THE WANTS AND INDUSTRIAL FEATURE OF THE SCHOOL. 

The pressing need of the institution is enlarged facilities to 
prosecute its work on even line with the purpose for which a 
was founded. It is in sad need of a dormitory hall for each of 
the sexes, and the necessary land on which to build. The 
school can never fully meet the requirements of its creation, 
until it is enabled to house all students who may apply. In 
a land and age where uninterrupted peace is increasing the popu- 
lation at a rate almost baffling belief, where the learned profes- 
sions are being overcrowded, and where the contest for bread is 
becoming so keen that to be classed in the list of "survival of 
the fittest" means the possession 'of hands most skillful and ver- 
satile in the mechanic arts, it were a? cruel as it would be im- 
politic to fail to train the young people in ways and means to 
obtain a livelihood by the sweat of the brow; and this fact applies 
with greater force to the youth of a poor and laboring class. 
The State could hardly place its money at better interest for the 
return that must follow in time, than in the expenditure of means 
to building up the industrial feature of the Normal College. 

With her scanty resources she has done nobly; but having 
ventured thus far, she cannot go amiss in continuing to foster, 
strengthen and solidify the schools with ample, means. 

Grateful for that which the Legislature and all departments 
of the government, and chiefly that of Public Instruction, have 
always cheerfully given in assuring the success of the Normal 
College for Colored Students, I have the honor to be, 

Very respectfully, 

T. DeS. Tucker. 

INSTITUTE FOR THE BLIND AND DEAF AND DUMB. 

This institution is located at St. Augustine and is designed to 
be a public school for those youth of both sexes who are afflicted 
with blindness, or who are deaf and dumb, and is therefore sup- 
plementary to the public school system; it is supported and main 
tained by regular Legislative appropriations, and is free of any 
charge for tuition or board, while clothing is supplied those 
whose parents are unable to furnish them. The buildings were 



21 

erected by the State on a lot of five acres of land donated by 
the citizens of St. Augustine, and is most favorably situated. 

In its course of instruction the teaching of speech is promi- 
nent, and many of the pupils have been taught to speak and 
read intelligibly. The main feature of instruction, however, 
is in the sign language, by which it is thought the mind can be 
more certainly and thoroughly reached and stored with useful 
and practical knowledge ; lip reading is also used and taught. 
Every means in the power of the faculty will be used to fit these 
unfortunate ones for the conflict o f life and make them useful 
citizens and not mischievous drones in the human hive, and 
therefore probable criminals, if neglected. 

Instrumental music and basket making are taught the blind, 
and other useful work, while gardening, printing and lathe work 
in wood are taught the boys who see, and general housewifery 
the seeing girls. 

For further details as to number of pupils in attendance, the 
condition of the buildings, necessities and prospects, I refer to 
the letter of the principal, Professor fra. A. Caldwell, which 
follows : 

St. Augustine, Fla,, December 31, 1890. 

T« the Hon. A. f. Russell, State Superintendent Public Instruction, 
ex-officio Secretary of the Board of Managers of the Florida 
Institute for the Deaf and the Blind ; 

Sir — I beg to submit the following report of the school which 
I have in charge : 

My own connection with this institute dates only three 
months back, so that I am unable to speak of its condition pre- 
vious to that time. I found in entering upon my duties here 
that the impression had gotten abroad in the State that the 
school had permanently closed, owing to the resignation of My 
predecessor. It took some time to remove this erroneous idea, 
but we have been successful in recalling most of last year's 
pupils, together with quite a number of new ones, so that we 
have now, I am told, more than were ever present at this season 
before, and enough others are promised alter the holidays to ex- 
ceed any number that has ever been here at any previous time. 

The pupils now present come from the following counties : 
Alachua, 6; Duval, 6 ; Jackson, 2 ; Lake, 1 ; Levy, 1 ;, Marion, 
8 ; Nassau, 2 ; Orange, 1 ; Pasco, r ; total, 28. 

While it is true that the school will certainly have a larger at- 
tendance this year than ever before, it is also true that but a 
small portion will be here of those entided to admission. It is 
no uncommon thing to hear the parents of a new pupil say, 
" We did not know there was such a school in Florida, or we 
should have had our child here before this. " 



Id order more extensively to advertise the school I have pre- 
pared a circular at your suggestion, addressed to the various 
superintendents of the county schools, earnesdy requesting them 
to inquire of the teachers, and especially of the scholars in the 
public schools, whether there are any deaf or blind children in 
their neighborhood. In this way it is hoped that the knowledge 
that there is such an institute may be spread through the State, 
until all of school age are brought under instruction. The 
present indications are that we shall be crowded for want of 
room before the close of this term, and our buildings would be 
utterly inadequate for the accommodation of one-third of the 
children in the State that belong here. It would be a great in- 
justice, however, if we are compelled from lack of room to turn 
any away, and it is hoped and believed that the legislature will 
continue to make ample provision for all who seek admission. 

It is generally recognized now that the founding and support 
of schools of this character are not so much a work of charity 
as of economy and forethought. Whether it is better to males 
intelligent, self supporting men and women of these children, or 
leave them to grow up in hopeless ignorance, often dangerous, 
irresponsible beings, is a question that does not admit of debate. 

An important part of the course in schools of this kind is 
the training of the pupils in trades and household duties, so that 
on leaving school they may be able to take up their share of 
life's burdens in their homes, and be a help instead of a load to 
their relatives. I regret to say that our facilities for teaching 
trades here are very incomplete. We ought to have a carpenter 
shop, a printing office and a blacksmith shop for the boys. 
There should also be more appliances for kindergarten work, 
such as clay modeling, painting with water colors, etc. Such- 
things train the ringers and eyes of the little ones and keep them 
out of mischief at the same time. I hope also to have the older 
girls instructed in cooking and needlework before die close of 
the term. 

The health of both officers and pupils, with a few exceptions 
of slight importance, has been excellent so far. 

The system of instruction that has been followed heretofore 
will be continued, except that more attention will be given to 
written language. Just as it is true that all persons cannot be- 
come expert penmen, so is it true that all deaf children cannot 
be taught to speak. In those cases where the mental develop 
ment of the child would manifestly be retarded by waiting for 
him to attain even an imperfect and uncertain mastery of the 
vocal chords, it is deemed advisable to substitute writing tor 
speech, and to train him to use the pen or pencil instead of his 
tongue for communicating his thoughts. I am not alone in this 
opinion ; it is the avowed belief of the ablest instructors in our 



line of work that our aim should be " the greatest good to the 
greatest number." At the same rime I desire to testify in this 
connection to the excellent results in speech and lip reading at- 
tained during Mr. Terrell's management of the school. 

The following changes have taken place in the corps of offi- 
cers and instructors : 

Mr. Park Terrell resigned his position as principal and was 
succeeded by Wm. A. Caldwell. 

Mrs. Laura A. Caldwell succeeds Miss A. L. Williams as 
matron. 

Miss Oakley Bockee takes the place of assistant matron. 

The vacancy caused by the resignation of Miss Kate King 
has been filled by the promotion of Miss Macmillan. This still 
leaves a vacancy in our ranks which has not yet been filled. / 

Mies Luna Sims continues in charge of the blind pupils and 
has added instruction in music and bead work to her other 
duties. 

Mr. Andrew Thompson succeeds Mr. A. J. Marshall as su 
pervisor of the boys. Respectfully submitted, 

Wm. A. Caldwell, 

Principal. 

INDUSTRIAL TRAINING. 

This important feature of popular education, now attracting 
so much attention throughout the country, has not been neg- 
lected in'this State. The school authorities, State and counties, 
have had it in view, and in several of the public schools in 
cities where large numbers of youth are gathered into the graded 
schools this feature has been very successfully introduced. It 
has become a point of deep and pleasant interest in every case 
to both teacher and pupil. 

In the Agricultural and Mechanical College, in the graded 
school at Pensacola, in the Urge graded school for negro youth 
at Jacksonville, in both the State Normal colleges, one for white 
students and one for negroes, it is taught in these latter with 
special reference to training teachers for their special work of 
teaching. 

In all these telegraphy, type-writing, mechanical drawing, a 
knowledge of steam power and the boiler and engine, printing 
and the use of tools and implements employed in the arts and 
trades are taught, students being required to make articles of 
use in the practice of tool cralt. 

It is to be regretted that so large a number of the practical 
farmers of the country are totally unable to stock a plow prop- 
erly, or to go to the farm forge and point a plow, or forge and 
weld a link in a broken trace, or do for themselves any of the. 
so often required things of the farm, but when an accident oc- 




! 



*4 

curs to wagon, plow, harrow, or any of the manifold, necessary 
implements, they must quit the field and repair to the smith or 
wheelwright, however distant, to do that for them which, if 
skilled themselves, they could have done at home, with their 
eyes still upon the (arm, in much less time frequently than that 
required to make the trip to and fro. 

The Board of Trustees of the Agricultural College are dis- 
posed to see that as many of the students as desire, or who may 
be led, shall leave the college equipped in this particular line as 
fully as in the line of the literary ; that is a noble way from the 
plow, anvil, engine and bench and field to an hour or more with 
Virgil, or mathematics, philosophy and astronomy, and back from 
these,ti the plow and anvil, with adaptability to either and use for 
both. Such knowledge makes a complete man. 

REFORMATORY SCHOOLS. 

I must again call Your Excellency's attention to the absolute 
necessity for a School of Reform, into which vicious and va- 
grant boys and girls may be placed upon proper adjudication, and 
be educated and taught useful vocations of life, and, under God, 
be returned to human society useful and honorable men and 
women. Such a school would not act only as a curative of the 
evil, but to a great extent as a preventive of that class of youth 
which proves such a curse to the cities and towns of the State, 
and who make the inmates of the prisons and the brothel. 

I receive frequent letters from parents and relatives asking 
if there is no school in the State where their boy or boys may 
be subjected to a rigid discipline and be thoroughly restrained. 
Such a school is very much needed and, if properly managed, 
would soon become largely self supporting. 

I will suggest that a certain portion of the Common School 
Fund be set apait annually for the support of such a school. 
since some of these boys and girls will come from almost every 
county ; each county will be the recipient of the benefits of such 
a school, and hence the equity in the use of a part of the fund 
mentioned for the purpose. 

TEACHERS' INSTITUTES. 

Although I have not been able to hold and conduct teach- 
ers' institutes as heretofore, because of the refusal of the Legis- 
lature to make the usual annual appropriation, yet many of the 
counties, realizing and appreciating the great importance, benefit 
and usefulness of these schools for teachers, have by dint of 
economy and determination held them during the spring and 
summer months, some for two months, one month, two weeks 
and one week, and most excellent and permanent work has been 
done and has been telling upon the schools in the class of work 



*5 

accomplished, and the children of the people have received the 
benefit. 

The counties holding them have been Polk, two months ; 
Hillsborough, one month ; Marion, one month ; Putnam, Wash- 
ington, Jefferson, one month ; Columbia, two weeks ; Levy, 
one month j Bradford, two weeks; St. Johns, one month; Es- 
cambia, two weeks ; Lake, Sumter and Pasco. The teachers 
assembled in these have all been earnest in their request for a 
repetition and increase of term. 

ARBOR DAY, 1890. 

In a hearty, responsive sentiment many of the counties 
faithfully and joyously caught the spirit of your proclamation 
setting apart a day in February, 1890, to be observed as Arbor 
Day, and inviting all the public schools to participate in using 
appropriate exercises and in planting trees. The result of that 
day, I am happy to report, exceeds all its predecessors. He. 
ports have been received from 32 of the 45 counties, and are as 
follows in the aggregate : 

Thirty-two counties reported. There were participating 769 
schools, 26,525 pupils, 5,154 parents present at the various 
schools, 11,069 trees planted. Upon investigation and reports 
made I safely estimate there are now living and in a flourishing 
condition 30,000 forest shade trees and fruit trees, out of 55,000 
planted since Arbor Day was inaugurated in this State in 1886. 
Beside these and the inestimable blessings that will flow from 
them, the lessons of a lofty and inspiring character so repeatedly 
taught and felt by so many parents and children, lifting the 
thought to God, the " God of the granite and the rose," though 
invisible yet everywhere present in the activities of His crea- 
tion.' Who can estimate the results of such a work, made such 
a joy? 

I am glad to report a steady growing approval and appreci- 
ation of the day and its uses and benefits in the minds and hearts 
of the people everywhere, and a still more earnest desire for its 
continuance comes to me from many sources. 

The State institutions of learning all participated, and the 
result of Arbor Day is to be seen upon the grounds. Notably 
is this the case in reference to the Agricultural and Mechanical 
College ; beautiful and thrifty oaks and other evergreens adorn 
its campus, and will, in the very near future, furnish delightful 
shades and open air study places. 

TABLES. 

For detailed information, statistically and financially, I refer 
you to the tables at the close, which will show the number of 
children of school age, the number enrolled, the number in daily 
average attendance, the amount of funds raised by the counties 



26 ■ 

and by the State, and accruing from the invested Common 
School Fund, and expended for the school year 1889-1890, 
ending September 30th, 1890. 

CONCLUSION. 

Again I am under many obligations to Your Excellency for 
the warm and hearty sympathy you have given to me in the dis- 
charge of my constantly increasing work, as well as the deep, 
unfeigned interest you have shown in its results and progress. 

I am gratefully pleased to report the complete harmony pre- 
vailing throughout the entire system, specially as to the county 
and State school authorities- Our system is excellent and I 
know of no change in the present law that I would suggest. 



REGULATIONS 
Prepared by the State Superintendent or Public 
Instruction and Adopted by the State 
Board of Education. 



OFFICERS. 



Regulation i. — Qualifications. — Persons, to be eligible 
to appointment to offices in this department must be well en- 
dorsed as possessing, substantially, the following qualifications : 

"They are personally known to us as citizens ol good moral 
character, upright, responsible, possessing a fair education, and 
desirous of extending the benefits of free public instruction to 
all classes of youth. .As officers, they will be found competent, 
impartial and faithful is the performance of their duties. For 
these reasons we commend them for appointment." 

Regulation a. — School Supervisors will be governed, in the 
general management of their affairs, under the directions of the 
Board of Public Instruction of the county. 

time of issuing certificates. 

Regulation 3. — Although a Board of Public Instruction may 
examine teachers and grant certificates, at anytime, or authorize 
the County Superintendent to do so, which may continue in 
force in tne county for one year from date, yet it may be found 
desirable to fix upon certain days and places at which this par- 
ticular duty will be attended to. Certificates may be issued to 
expire within the year, to correspond with the times of holding 
the meetings. By such an arrangement, both the board and 
teachers would be accommodated. 

Ample notice should be given of all such meetings by the 
County Superintendents, so that every teacher, or person desir. 
ous of teaching, may have the opportunity of preparing for the 
examination. 

Regulation 4. — All applicants for First Class or State Cer- 
tificates, must apply through County Superintendents, under 
whom they are employed, and have the endorsement of both the 
Superintendent and Chairman of the County Board of Public In- 
struction in every case. 

Examinations will be conducted at, or during, County Insti- 
tutes as far as possible. 

Regulation 5. — Teacher's Certificates of the First 
Class will be granted by the State Superintendent of Public In- 



f 



23 

struction to eminently successful teachers of the second class 
who, on examination, answer 85 per cent, of the questions sub- 
mitted in the branches usually taught in high schools. 

Graduates of normal schools may receive First Class Certifi- 
cates without examination, who hold diplomas from colleges of 
undoubted reputation and other colleges in which Pedagogics 
are taught. No exception will be made to this regulation ex- 
cept the State Superintendent shall have strong and satisfactory 
reasons for the same. 

Regulation 6. — Third and Second Class Certificates will be 
issued by the County Boards of Public Instruction based upon 
the following: 

Any person, to be considered a teacher in the meaning of 
the school law, or entitled to compensation for services or any of 
the privileges and immunities of a teacher, must, at the time of 
performing the services or claiming the immunities, hold a 
teacher's certificate unimpaired by suspension, revocation or 
limitation. 

Eligibility. — A candidate for teaching, to be eligibU to an 
examination, must produce satisfactory evidence of being of 
strictly temperate habits and maintaining a good moral charac- 
ter. 

And— 

1 st. To be able to read intelligently from any school reader 
in common use, and properly teach the same. 

ad. To spell correctly the words of any ordinary sentence. 

3d. To be able to write well and teach the same. 

4th. To solve readily the questions involving the rules of 
arithmetic, to square root, and to explain the principles on which 
their solution depends. 

5th, To have a general knowledge of geography; as the loca- 
tion and boundaries of continents; the relative positions of the 
principle countries, oceans, seas, and rivers; the boundaries and 
capitals of the United States and of several States and Territories, 
and the counties and rivers of Florida. 

6th. To have a general knowledge of the history of the 
United States and of the State of Florida. 

7th. To have a good practical knowledge of school organiza- 
tion, classification, management and discipline, and of the arts 
of interesting youth and imparting instruction. 

Rule. — No certificate will be issued to applicants who, on ex- 
amination, fail to answer 75 per cent, of the questions submitted 
in the above branches for a Third Class Certificate. 

The following for a Second Class Certificate : T 

Second Class. — In addition to the foregoing qualifications, 



a candidate for a Second Class Certificate must, on examination, 

be able — 

i . To read with ease and accuracy. 

2. To write a plain, free hand, and teach the same. 

3. To spell correctly. 

4. To solve readily the questions in any practical arithmetic 
in common use. 

5. To have a good knowledge of geography. 

6. To be familiar with the English Grammar, so as to apply 
its principles correctly in composing, spelling and punctuating a 
letter, or an ordinary sentence. 

7. To have a good knowledge of the outlines of general his- 
tory, and especially that of the United States and of Florida. 

S. To be acquainted with the elements of book-keeping. 

9. To understand and be able to explain the principles which 
underlie the branches taught. 

10. To understand well the proper organization, classification, 
management and discipline of a school, the improved methods 
of teaching, and possess good self-control. 

No applicant will be awarded a certificate, who, on examina- 
tion, fails to answer 80 per cent, of the questions proposed in 
the above branches. 

Regulation 7. — The State Board of Education are deeply 
impressed with the fact that the large majority of the children in 
attendance upon the public schools are the children of the poorer 
people, and will fill the large and important classes of farmers, 
workmen, mechanics and artisans of the State, and that to im- 
part to them only the knowledge to be derived from the school 
books, excellent and necessary as it is, will but illy equip them 
(or the sphere of life to which in Providence and circumstances 
they are very sure to he called, and are still more impressed 
with the necessity of imparting to them some knowledge (to the 
boys especially) of the useful and necessary tools and implements 
used in the arts and trades, and to the girls some training in 
sewing, cookery and housewifery in general by simple illustra- 
tive lectures or talks upon their use, and the general principles 
involved, so that a taste may be cultivated for these very useful 
and important vocations in life, and some knowledge imparted of 
them, but mainly to impress them with a true and proper con- 
ception of the honor and dignity of honest labor. County Su- 
perintendents and Boards of Public Instruction are urgently and 
specially called upon to give their earnest attention to this very 
important feature of school work and instruction. 

Regulation 8. — The evil of intemperance abroad in the 
land demands the attention of all true men and women every- 



3° 

where, that its tide may be turned back, and the great social evil 
abated, therefore the State Board of Education call upon all 
County Superintendents and County Boards of Public Instruc- 
tion to see that the pupils are from time to time, as the regular 
work and duties of the school will permit, impressed with the 
evils Bowing from the use of intoxicants and narcotics morally, 
physically, socially and financially, so that a wholesome concep- 
tion of the evil and ruin wrought by them may be had by every 
pupil. 

Regulation 9. — As the spirit of the school law clearly in- 
tends to prevent entanglement at all possible by contracting or 
bargaining among members of the County Boards of Public In- 
struction, therefore the State Board of Education would most 
earnestly admonish all members of these Boards to entirely re- 
frain from the employment of persons in any manner who are 
nearly allied to them by the ties of relationship, specially of a 
close nature, and would especially suggest to those who in the 
past have been thus situated to free themselves at once of the 
entanglement, and that in the future no one will be recom- 
mended for appointment in any relation in the school work who 
contemplates such employment. 

A very considerable part of the dissatisfaction which does ex- 
ist in some school neighborhoods is created by this condition of 
affairs, and the general cause of education in the State must be 
relieved of it. 

Regulation 10. — AH teachers should of their own purpose 
seek from time to time to advance the class of their certificates 
by diligent and persistent study and the constant reading of the 
best journals of school work, and books treating methods, discip- 
line and government of the school, and so pass from the lowest 
to the highest grade of certificate, and carry with it the increased 
capacity for the true work of the school room. 

County Superintendents discovering a disposition on the part 
of certain teachers to remain content with any certificate they 
may be fortunate enough to obtain, exhibiting no desire to rise 
higher or to become better qualified for their important work, 
should at once report the same to the Board of Public Instruction 
and recommend their removal from the corps of teachers in the 
county. 

The authority for making these Regulations will be found in 
the School Law Pamphlet, pages 7 and 8, section 13, clauses 
5th and nth. 



3r 







Table No. 1. 










COUNTIES. 


8 

1 

5 

&4 


| 

i 

*M 

■ 

11 
§1 


3 

MS 

11 

3 - 


£~ 
II 

- 3 i 

■c — — 


■65? 

s - 

» 5 a 


Si 
S a 

S3 | 

a — -= 

go e 


z - 

■5 J 

- 1 
1 1 = 


i £ 

Si 

:- 

* 2 

R B 




? 


a 


» - 


e 


< 


sc 


fc 


£ 


Alachua 


105 


62 


43 


5843 


3*36 


2651 


8192 


132 




87 

01 


32 

48 


5 

8 


106B 
2338 


720 
1732 


821 
8016 


248 
322 


39 


Bradford 


60 


Brevard 


44 


39 


5 


687 


532 


599 


ss 


44 


Cathoun 


27 


20 


7 


680 


4IHI 


490 


1B0 


27 


Clay.. 


.32 
71 


44 
46 


8 
25 


1257 
3078 


2028 


994 

1638 


an 

148.5 


56 


Columbia 


Ts 




83 


30 


3 


572 


-14.3 


499 


78 


sa 


Dade 


8 
81 
67 


8 
49 
56 


"32 
1 


170 
4296 
1630 


152 
3290 

1302 


no 

1820 
1612 


2476 

18 


19 




134 


DeSoto 


54 




52 


34 


18 


3380 


2291 


1997 


1883 


74 




7 


5 


2 


.350 




333 


217 


11 


Gadsden 


77 


43 


34 


3190 


2115 


11 IK* 


2102 


81 


Hamilton 


66 


45 21 


1949 


1090 


1257 


692 


69 




26 


IN 8 


651 


-C.'i 


44.3 


216 


26 


Hillsborough .... 


73 


66 r 


2777 


1878 


2414 


363 


88 


Holmes 


41 


4i.l 


1 


1804 


728 


i>i 


20 


40 


Jackson 


79 
62 


48 
32 


81 
80 


4287 
4018 


2*58 

2168 


1839 
892 1 


. 2452 
* 3026 


82 


Jefferson 


76 


Lafayette 


43 


42 1 


901 


619 


874 


27 


42 




59 
54 

13 
15 


2,3 34 
41 13 


3789 

1814 
828 
263 


2580 

10!) 1 

220 

182 


:340 

1192 

151 

253 


3249 

177 
ID 


64 


Lew 


56 




6 

14 


7 

1 


13 




15 




63 

81 


50 
45 


18 
86 


1801 
8714 


1438 
2684 


1365 
1506 


436 

8am 


70 


Madison 


85 




87 
118 


36 

73 


1 

411 


812 

5085 


649 
3134 


776 
2286 


36 
2799 


39 




135 




8 
58 


6 
41 


a 

17 


1455 
2126 


485 
1831 


856 

1187 


599 

939 


25 


Nassau 


69 




83 
21 
80 
76 
37 
32 


69 
20 
75 
50 
86 
25 


14 
1 
5 

7 


2615 

796 
2276 
2682 
1175 
1383 


8818 

468 
1765 

1735 

669 

1080 


1865 
752 

2120 

1458 

1160 
887 


750 
44 

1.56 

1334 

1.3 
526 


93 


Osceola 


25 


Polk 


91 




84 




41 


St. Johns 


50 




71 


60 


11 


2384 


1715 


17.32 


ssa 


72 




3H 

69 


3tl 
46 


8 
28 


1417 
8035 


1006 
1888 


993 

1700 


424 

1335 


46 




75 


Tavlor 


31 
63 


30 

■3)1 


1 
13 


679 
2069 


350 

1378 


636 
1509 


43 

500 


27 


Volusia 


72 


Wakulla 


2s 


19 


9 


725 


476 


495 


230 


29 


Walton 


sa 

58 


48 
49 


5 
9 


1782 
1765 


1143 

1103 


1551 
1405 


231 
360 


53 


Washington .... 


54 




2,338 


1,746 


587 


92.472 


60,819 


55,191 


87,281 


2,510 



3* 



Table No. 2. 




At«Mina 

Baker 

Bradford 

Brevard 

Citrus 

C&Uunn 

Ctay 

Columbia 

Dade 

Duval 

DeSoto 

Escambia.. . . 

Franklin 

Gadsden. 
Hamilton . . . 
Hera&ndo — 
Hillsborough 

Holmes 

Jackson 

Jefferson . . , . 
Lafayette * . . . 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon.-.-- ... 
Levy ....... 

Liberty 

Madison 

Manatee 

Marion ...... 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Orange 

Osceola 

Pasco 

Polk 

Putnam. ..... 

SI. Johns 

Santa Rosa . . 

Sumter 

Suwannee . . . 

Taylor 

Volusia 

Wakulla 

Walton 

Washington . 

Totals .. 



$ 4,053,231 to 4 

644.539 °oj 4 

1,260,54000 4 

I.I45)*7* ™ I 4 

958,198 00. 4 

404,34600 3 

1.554,*42 9ol 3% 

1,012,000 00 4 



Cget 84 i 

1.39' *> 
64501 

50986 

593 49 
1,164 T 6 
3,877 JO 
74 74 
5,40s 00 
1,3" 04 
3,o« 35 

45*88 
34'3 £* 
1.8448* 

57*46 
3,60628 
1 .059 68 
2,19a 62 
$.026 Ba 

1,77*5 

33384 
5,677*8 
1,20* 50 



fB6\5W.334 14 < 399,755 56 f 33.073 83 t 84, 103 31 f 4Q7,*49 07 I 76.6'* 7* 



2 2 ,4 'J" BG 
3,93000 

9.3*500 

4&° 
*,£S5 00 
1.26500 
6,90500 
9,20000 
3,00000 
50,65000 



37,66a 07 
7,00000 
8.00000 

18.39500 
5,350 00 

21,135™ 
2,25000 



4.57S 00 



4,185 00 
65500 

1,65000 
5*5O0 
40500 



1,40500 
2,2 JO OO 

JOOOO 
6,000 00 

14*00 
3,83500 
1,000 00 
1,490 00 
2,85500 

49OOO 
3,077<» 



3060O 



'■SIS 

3,55000 

70000 

167 00 

1,05000 

1,3m 00 

4,5'* 00 

1,65000 

3.63500 

11,54* 00 

63500 

1,55*35 

1,50000 

4000 

1,93500 

30000 

1,17000 

3,45000 



5.718 00 



1,60000 
48500 



35 

Table Twj. 3. 



COUNTIES, 



M 

— 
'9& 



MM 



«- a 
C 6. 

fj 



1 

t-l 



e 
I 



8 



1 



5 



Alachua 

Baker 

Bradford. . . , 

Brevard 

Calhoun 

Citrus 

flay 

Columbia 

Dade 

DeSoto 

*Duval 

Escambia., . . 

Franklin 

Gadsden 

Hamilton.. . . 

Hernando . . . 

Hillsborough 

Holmes. 

Jackson 

Jefferson, , . . 
, Lafayette 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty 

Madison 

Manatee .... 

Marion 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Orange ... 

Osceola 

Pasco 

Polk 

Putnam 

St. Johns..-.., 
Santa Rosa. . . 

Sumter 

Suwannee 

Tavlor 

Volusia 

Wakulla 

Walton 

Washington . . 

Totals 



1.374 
KM 

1,118 
288 
370 
289 
473 
S-M 



861 
851 

1,002 
182 
578 
848 
248 

1,889 
874 

Me 



90S 

875 
118 
270 
599 
S3 
725 
426 

1.198 
445 
566 
901 
400 
575 

1,190 
728 
431 
904! 
5811 
B8B 
418 1 

SOT 

24V 

835 

700 



1,277 
417 
900 
313 
220 
230 
521 
702 



736 

889 
995 

193 
512 
009 
197 
1,085 
610 
871 



390 
926 

137 

271) 

U8 

80 

717 

350 

1.088 

411 

621 

964 

385 

585 

1.080 

732 

406 

848 

463 

818 

319 

702 

25(1 

716 

645 



8 38,137 60 
3,310 00 
1,646 00 
5,990 00 
2,250 00 
4. J 20 M 
0.383 00 
9,226 74 
1,800 00 
7,393 05 
2.577 53 

17.807 10 
1,860 00 

10.105 25 
11.256 00 



18.883 001 



9,617 OU 

11,523 28 

4,422 00 

13,999 74 



9,987 50 

0.152(H) 

079 On 

8,831 25 

1,113 35 

23,809 50 



10,050 50 
17,407 10 
5,141 90 
6,886 25 
14,61100 
8,191 50 
7,190 00 
9.459 78 



. 8,089 40 

2.340 00 

17,978 19 

2.1 WO 00 
5.391 00 
4.865 00 



8 1,200 00 

■JIM! (HI 

421 

500 (Ml 

350 00 

SCO iki 

510 00 

.540 00 

300 00 

49100 

1,300 00 

900 00 

75 (Kl 

600 00 

430 00 

450 00 

1,200 00 

'.' Kl 

300 00 
600 00 
200 00 
1,080 00 
250 00 
1,020 00 
600 00 
150 00 
774 'Hi 
.500 00 
960 00 
400 00 
620 00! 
1,300 00 
525 00 
588 88 
800 00 
900 00 
600 00 
850 00 
600 00 

lilKMIil 

200 00 
740 00 
220 00 
100 00 

380 00 



27,778 25,861 £ 336,405 52!$ 25,068 33 89.185 998 86,766 72 



* 236 40 
132(H) 
126 HO 
1 03 00 
290 00 
139 60 
134 80 
138 00 
84 00 
204 00 
202 00 

■ Mm' 

72 00 
213 80 
176 30 

96 00 
234 IK. 

63 60 



057 19 

204 00 

193 20 
| HO 40 
107 80 
155 40 
190 80 
345 no 
100 00 
248 60 

178 00; 

611 201 
331 10 1 

173 30! 
6(10 ooi 
210 80 
130 10 
179 «(> 
107 60 
157 10 
134 40 
179 00 
155 20 
151 00 
155 60 



§964 06 

75iHt 

=142 26 

502 94 

10 00 

126 66 

1,277 10 

8,028 77 

"1mm 

6,435 50 

1,471 04 

250 00 

868 12 

358 64 

443 44 

941 59 

73 00 

316 50 

2,210 82 

10156 

663 8» 

583 40 

178 74 

'■: re 
1*9 92 
786 84 



2,801 34 

1,251 08 

1.213 71 

920 58 

,543 03 

370 00 

76 00 

4,961 81 

534 66 

75 80 
435 34 

75 00 
344 34 
125 00 

11 40 
785 87 



This must he for Jacksonville alone. 



- - >M 



34 



Table No. 4. 



COUNTIES. 



|3 
El 

m 

Mi 

llif 

K 






II 



L 

oh 
11 

55 



X 

£ 



S5 



Alachua 

Baker 

Bradford 

Brevard 

Calhoun. . . . 

Citrus 

Hay 

Columbia. 

Dade 

DeSoto 

Duval 

Escambia 

Franklin. 

Gadsden 

Hamilton 

Hernando . . . . 
Hillsborough . 

Holmes 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Lafayette 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty 

Madison 

Manatee 

Marion 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Oranp 



Fasco 

Folk 

Putnam 

St. Johns 
Santa Rosa. . 
Sumter. 
Suwannee. . . 

Taylor 

Volusia 

Wakulla. . .. 

Walton 

Washington 



Totals. 



1.556 
122 
157 

54 
100 

43 

tn 

663 



1,637 
126 

165 

H 

it" 

31 

131 

752 



10 

1.174 

677 



8 

1,292 

Ton 



1,1)48 
831 

92 

169 

HI 
1,251 



1,054 

361 

124 

194 

10; 

1.301 ■ 



2 
3 

to 
ia 

8 



ta 



I: 



1,468* 

337! 

92! 

1.055 

2H 

1,333 

804 

380 

372 

26 

10 

74 

605 

256 

301 

205 

663 

30 

273 

115 

110 

176 



127 16,086 



15 

198 
6 

1,781' 

285: 

86 

1,149 

16 

1,486 
245^ 
559 

378 1 

181 

5 

88 

619 

272 

331 

219 

672. 

23 

287' 

115 

121 

184 



17,048 



59 
5 

9 
5 
5 

3 
9 

29 



1 
58 
23 



31 

7 

9 

1 

31 

32 

1 

13 

1 

36 

14 

7 

27 

1 

48 

8 

83 

19 

1 

1 

5 

27 

13 

8 

Hi 

35 

1 

15 

9 

4 

8 



73 
24 

51 
41 
17 
30 
47 
49 
9 
54 
75 



46 
48 
18 
74 
40 
52 
44 
41 
57 
14 
28 
42 
6 
42 
37 
87 
17 
47 
74 
24 
III 
107 
57 
37 
42 
36 
50 
31 
67 
20 
43 
31 



661 



1,849 



-J5 
Table No. 5. 



COUNTIES. 


M 

I 

r 


n 
u 



b, 

tm ■ 

3 

< 


1 
i 

|* 

|| 

2 


u 
jd 

n 

1 


If 

11 

11 


i 

G 
3 

z 

I 
% 

I 


M 

3 ■ 
z 

1, . 

i - ,a : 

pi 

< 




l373»« 




* 4.184 75 desks 




S 9,636 70 
















Brevard..... .... 


728 00 
300 00 


330 OO 
30 OO 


J 




■■ 71 


71 OO 


770 00 

55000 




















n»5 00 
202 DO 


UI 67 


4 




■■ 90 


1*5 75 


1,150 00 




400 00 















K scam hi a. .... 


3537 46 
no rep' t 


S 00, 7 
1330 61 6 


5,°75 95 'desks, double. 


. 267 
■• 35° 


S50 00 
1,18657 


14.4 IS M 
5,4<» Oj 




12S5 oo 
1050 CO 


3* 50 
5S1 00 


3 
5 


300 00 
650 00 








3.10-* OO 
1,563 00 








+4000 


















































































Lake 


1958 oa 


137 38 






sittings. 




150 00 














57S °° 
975 oo 
39a 00 


345*7 
170 00 

9 00 


7 
S 
1 





• 40 
19 


20854 
So 00 
147 00 


5,345 co 

i .^aj M 

405 00 


































::::::::i:::: 








3320 00 


380 00 7 




-• 5°o; 


1,000 OO 


3.*3* 7S 






596 00 


71 35 * 







402 68 










s^BS 00 
1318 00 
819 00 

Son 00 




9,000 00 desks 

2,335 00 desks, . . 




1,000 00 

SO 00 


5.885 00 
4 ■"* 27 
J.55S *5 
1.313 "• 


St, Johns 


150 00 

6899"? 


6 




s 


642 53 deslu and charts, 500 


1,16898 




48 00 

50000 

45" 00 


95 40 3 

104 TO 1 3 




ISO no 

»,I4I 90, 
50 00 




■ ■ 32 


75000 
3,540o8 


4S0 00 

4,561 34 
760 00 










i 


761 00 


gi dq 


4 
93 


445 07 

f 33. 004.62 


seats 


. , Gog 
5-744 


609 30 
1 12,673,00 


565 00 
» 69.78*^4 



Note,— I regret that all the reports for this table could not have been received, but I 
kept this as long as possible from the printer. It will be seen that only twenty-tbree of the 
counties are beard from, and In these $69,782.24 have been expended for teaching negro 
schools ; of course, the remaining twenty-two counties would largely increase the amount. 
Ninety-three school houses have been built during the year, costing $33,004. 62 ; 5,744 sittings 
have been supplied, at an expense of (12,673.00. Thi other columns show the amount of 
poll tax received by school treasurer, and amount of fines collected and paid in. 



36 



Table No. 6. — Census of School Population, 1888. 



1 "I'NTIESi. 


i I 
-■s 

S 3 


3 

I 

1- 

= 1 


01 

I 


a 
§ 

ll 
k 

- -i 


, of White Youth lie- 
weeu the ages of 4 & 31 , 


Z** 

&■* 

•J 


2"S 

— — 
- - 

■si 

. St 


1 
Id 

^ 3 1 * 

ll 

- i 


a 


11 

■f- 
--, 

.5-c 

ll 

a-* 
- 1 


a 




H 3J 


e *6 SI 


c « I » *> 


- +J 


** 


q ^3 * -*a 


s ** 




fc 


55 £ 


£ ' fc 


g 


Z 


is z 


53 


Alachua . . . 


8,763 


8.566. 4.45S 


4.319J 3,691 


5,067 










Baker 


1.241 


1.114; 66S 


"582 9M 


287 


C 


1 


a 


134 


Bradford 


2,145j 1,880 1.138 


1,006' 1,842 


303 





2 


40 


307 




1.117' 673 


521 


4981 888 


129 


a 


8 


26 


103 


Calhoun 


8TO 803 


478 


396 tee 


217 


t 





3 


71 


CUT 


1.087 1,574 


902 785! 1,295 


392 


1 


1 


58 


324 


Columbia . . . 


4,404 3.875 


2,342- 2.062 f 2,341 


2.063 


1 


1 


72 


Citrus 


748' 688 
148 101 


441, 308 

77 42 


677 
114 


72 
S 












(1 


6 


2 


14 




s.iKi'.i 7.3on 4. KM a,S85 


S.2I*< 


4.821 


39 


"J*j 


163 


1,240 


DeSoto. 


2,048 1,788' 1.088 9.15 2.018i 





"6 


7 


216 


Escambia . . . 


5,868 4.9a 1 2,946 


8,9*3] 3,254 


2,614 


1 


2 


92 


730 


Franklin 


518 612 353 


36l| 488 


227 


.0 





33 


160 


Gadsden .... 


5.091 ! 4,613 2.529 


8,562] 1,602 3,489 





12 


73; 231 


Hamilton . . . 


2,846 2.493 1.474 


1,372 1,787 1,05» 


1 


1 


87 


357 


Hernando . . . 


821 


779 415 


406 


57r 


250 








7 


12 


Hillsborough 


4,014 


3,322 3,142 


1,882 


3,395 


619 





1 


94 


753 


Holmes 


1,642 


1,432 852; 790 


1.586 


56 


2 


2 


81 


126 


Jackson ..... 


8,705 


2,963 


1,944 


l,W1 


1,956 


1,749 


! 5 


6 105 


148 


Jefferson .... 


7,719 


6,793 


4.101 


3,618 1,430 


6,280 


f 


2 


43 


459 


Lafayette . . , 


1,480 


1.206 


82* 


653 1,412 


68 


1 


1 


86 


366 


Leon 


9,008 


7.672 4, CI! 


+.397 


842 


8,166 





1 


188 


775 


Levr 


1,897 1,626 1,007 


890 


1,260 637 








26 


235 


Liberty 


iS8 410 239 


218 


383 


225 








4 


45 




874 1 316 208 
2,646 2,401 1,348 


566 


367 


17 
624 




1 




2 


5 

51 


45 


Lake 


1.298 2,032 


337 




4,441 3.959 2.286 


2.155 1,865 


2,576 





2 


«7 


488 


Maiiiitce .... 


7o2 668 372 


330 662 


40 








7 


89 


Marion 


7,845i (1.894 3,976 


8,885 :;.:;»; 1 


4,472 


6 


8 212 


1,063 


Monroe 


&jm\ 4.479 2,11) 


2,368! 3,141 


1.338 





0| 82 


758 


Nassau 


3,450 2-. 787 1,786 1,664 1,644 


1,806 


3 


t) 31 


448 


Orange 

Osceola 


3.161 2,870 1.602 


1,499' 3,378 


783 


4 


i'l III 


221 


!>.-,i 


917! 491 


463 879 


75 





10 


98 


Polk. 


2,959 


2.708 1,502 


1,425, 2,667 


288 


1 





37 


174 


Putnam 


2,940 2,727 1.490 


1,450 1.117 


1,823 








45 


87 




1,311 3,234 716 


595' 1,299 


12 


1 





3 


38 


St. Johns. . . . 


2,445. 2,109 1,036 1,073, 1,410 


699 








27 


133 


Santa Rosa. . 


2.908 2.469- 1,601 


1.307; 2,170 


738 





2 


20 


40 


Sumter 


1,452 1,378 795 


657 1 1,019 


433 








5 


58 


Suwannee . , . 


2.335 


2,067 1,2.51 


1,084] 1,496 


83* 


3 


3 


82 


402 


Tavlor 


1.073 


926 590 


4831 1,021 


52 








26 


234 


Volusia 


1,972 


1.842 1,024 


94* 1.504 


468 





1 


31 


193 


Wakulla 


871 


752 388 


362: 556 


315 





2 


10 


105 




1,509 


1,275; 812 


697] 1,268 


241 





2 








Washington . 


1,389; 1,210 710 


624: 1.120 


219 





1 


35 


224 


Total*. . . 1 


29,112 113,647 65,812* 


3,300:68.514 1 


,0,5981 


83 


87l2,018 1 


2,564 



37 



LIST OF SUPERINTENDENTS OF COMMON SCHOOLS. 



county. 



NAME. 



POSTOFFICE. 



Alachua 

Baker 

Bradford 

Brevard 

Calhoun 

Citrus 

Clay..,. 

Columbia . , . 

Dade 

DeSoto 

Duval 

Escambia 

Franklin 

Gadsden ....', 

Hamilton 

Hernando 

Hillsboroujrh , 

Holmes 

Jackson . 

Jefferson 

Lafayette 

Lake , .. . 

Lee 

Leon 

Levy , 

Liberty 

Madison 

Manatee 

Marion 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Orange 

Osceola 

Pasco 

Polk 

Putnam 

St. Johns 

Santa Rosa . . . 

Sumter 

Suwannee 

Taylor 

Volusia 

Wakulla 

Walton 

Washington .. 



W. N. Sbeats Gainesville. 

G. B. Blair McClenny. 

Joseph L. Hill Lake Butler:, 

JOHH H. Sams Courtney. 

J. H. McClellan Bio untti town. 

E. A. Harrison 'Lecam. .. 

E. E, Rankin Green Cove Springs. 

E. G. Persons Fort White. 

•It 'us- Clehixsob (Jupiter. 

11. E. C aki.kton Fort Green. 



I Joel D. Mead Jacksonville. 

N. B. Cook Pensacola. 

Wm. T, Marler Apalachicola. 

( ' B. L. Allison Quincy. 

Geo. J. Graham Jennings. 

[>k. J. R. Temple jBrooksville. 

L. W. Bcchhoiz Bluomingdale. 

Whitmh.i, Curry Lsagora. 

Wh. M. Farrior Camiil ell ion. 

J. A. Walker lAuctlla. 

Z ac n a si a ii Jones New Troy. 

John C. Comfton iTavares. 

D. C. Kantz IFort Myers. 



N. 77. Eppes . 
Sheltqn Phillips. . 

T. J, Gregory 

R. L. Williams 

E, M. Graham 

Marion L. Payne , , 

C. F. Kemp 

Ephraim Harrison. 

John T. Berks 

C. A, Carson 

R. M.Ray 

S. S. NlBLACK 

Alex. Strauz 

; Peter Arnow 

Geo, W. Curtis 

C. Whitfield 

A. W. Mjzei-l 

John R. Kelly 

N. S. C. Perkins . . . 

R. B. Forbes 

John A. Campbell . 
'L. L. Charles 



Tallahassee. 

Bronson. 

Bristol. 

Madtson. 

Braidentown. 

Oeaia. 

Key West 

Dyali. 

Orlando. 

Kissimmee. 

Dade t.'it>. 

Lakeland. 

Palatka. 

St. Augustine. 

Milton. 

Sumterville. 

Well'KJin. 

Spring Warrior. 

DeLund. 

Crawfordville. 

Ponce de Leon. 

Vernon.